I times per minute. When a person blinks

I predict that the culprit who stole the papers is Mr. Stewart. The reason behind my suspicion is based three factors, facial expression, body language and verbal indicators. Firstly, while an average person blinks roughly 6-8 times per minute when not lying, an increased blink rate is often consistent with telling lies. When looking at Mr.Stewart’s alibi, he is seen to be blinking 56 times per minute. When a person blinks rapidly, it is a sign of stress and anxiety from lying. (Customerexpressions.com, 1999)This is linked directly to cognitive load. Liars are typically under a heavy cognitive load; and when under a heavy cognitive load, the brain pays more attention to processing critical information than to automatic body functions like eye blinking. Liars who are under a heavy cognitive load experience an increase in eye blink rate. Since lying is intentional and deliberate, liars have to think more about what their response will be and also having to maintain the same lie throughout the process. These tasks can be very challenging, especially under heavy cognitive load causing less conscious attention to eye blink rate. (Schafer, 2014)In addition, in Mr.Stewart’s alibi, he demonstrates verbal signs such as hesitating, repeating in the word no and using complex and difficult phrases. When a liar repeats the word no (or the word ‘not’), look frantically in both directions or denies something after hesitating, it is a sign that the person is trying to come up with a complex lie. Furthermore, Mr.Stewart is constantly hesitant, which is a psychological behaviour liars share when trying to come up with a story to defend themselves. And since providing fake evidence takes time and concentration, Mr.Stewart’s eyes dilate. Pupil dilation is a dependable indicator of lying as enlarged pupils are a sign of attentiveness. In other words, he is making it up as he goes along. (Rinkunas, 2012)